Brain decline reflected in patient's brush strokes

日期:2019-03-08 12:17:02 作者:别饬娓 阅读:

By Ewen Callaway (Image: Neurocase) (Image: Neurocase) (Image: Neurocase) (Image: Neurocase) (Image: Neurocase) (Image: Neurocase) (Image: Neurocase) See a gallery of the paintings In the late spring of 2001, a 52-year-old lawyer quit his job in southern California, moved to San Francisco and began devoting most of his time to creating art. A year later, doctors at the University of California San Francisco diagnosed the man, known as “VW”, with two neurodegenerative conditions – frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). VW had never shown any interest in art before. But degeneration in a brain area responsible for controlling impulses might explain his creative urge, says Anli Liu, a neurologist and artist who recently authored a case report on VW. At the same time, symptoms of ALS limited VW’s motor control and, eventually, his ability to create art. The series of paintings reveal the changes at work within VW’s brain. “There’s a kind of story you can get from looking at pathology,” she says. “There’s a different kind of story that you can get from looking at artwork.” Journal reference: Neurocase (DOI: 10.1080/13554790802633213) See a gallery of the paintings See also: Boléro: ‘Beautiful symptom of a terrible disease’ More on these topics: